Add Certified Project Manager to Your Credentials

This year with a boom in building and a healthy economy, there is an increasing need for Construction Project Managers. If you are newly entering this field, or you want to add to your credentials, you should definitely consider getting certified.

Project managers supervise construction projects from start to finish, ensuring that projects are completed on time and within budget. An understanding of the construction process, business and the ability to work in a fast-paced, ever evolving business and adhere to tight deadlines are crucial. Work experience in the industry is one of the most important requirements for this field. Bachelor’s degrees are becoming more common and many construction project managers pursue certification also, even though this is optional.

Project managers control costs, time, and the quality of construction ventures. They handle all kinds of projects from residential, schools and commercial buildings to industrial buildings, roads and bridges. They plan and coordinate every aspect of the construction process, from hiring contractors, working with engineers and architects to dealing with vendors. One project manager may oversee an entire construction project, or there may be multiple managers overseeing specific parts of a project. Project Managers usually start out working for a construction firm, but often branch out to own their own company. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that construction managers earn, on average, $92,700 a year. The outlook for Construction Project Management jobs are anticipated to grow 16 percent from 2012-2022, making this quite a lucrative and promising career.

Construction project managers are increasingly expected to have a bachelor’s degree in some construction-related field like building science, construction management or civil engineering. Years of construction experience is still needed to enter this profession and can be gained through working as an intern, some area as a crafts man or supervisor on a construction job. Working closely with other project managers is important to gain real world experience and industry knowledge.

Earning a master’s degree in a construction-related field could open the door to higher paying jobs at large construction firms, but is certainly not required. To greatly improve one’s marketability in general as a Project Manager in construction, earning a certification is highly recommended. Visit The American Institute of Constructors website to see their offerings for Associate Constructor and Certified Professional Constructor certifications. The Construction Management Association of America offers a certification for Certified Construction Manager. Also, the Project Management Professional is a widely industry-recognized certification for project managers in construction areas. The PMP shows employers and clients alike that you speak and understand the global language of project management.

Getting certified in one or more of these disciplines will help you to adopt practices for exploring a variety of perspectives. Here are some crucial points that you will learn upon becoming a certified Construction Project Manager.

1. We assume we see what we see, but we really see what we think. Make it a habit to inquire what others see. Together, you can see more and it will make efforts on the project much more efficient.

2. Stay close to your customer. Clients’ concerns will grow and change over the life of a project. Keep communication open with them to assure you deliver above and beyond what they expect.

3. Take care of your project team and they will take care of you. We can’t take care of the customer properly if we aren’t taking care of our project team. It comes down to taking care of each team member as individuals, ensuring they feel heard, nurtured and valued.

4. Keep your eye on your project promises. Deliver what you promise and be careful not to promise what you don’t know you can deliver. Project work can be difficult. Remind yourself as well as your team of the your promises and what you are doing to fulfill those promises.

5. Build relationships intentionally. Yes, build client and team relationships with purpose and put forth the work to nurture those relationships. To do great work, innovation, learning and collaboration requires people who like each other and care. Don’t leave that to chance.

6. Learning and action go hand in hand. Projects are fantastic opportunities to learn. You should make it a habit to incorporate learning into all of your project activities. Your team will appreciate it and your customer will undoubtedly benefit from it, as well. Not to mention, it will make your job easier.

7. Coordinate precisely. A construction project is an ever-evolving network of commitment. Tend to the critical conversations to keep these networks active. Make sure that people are making clear requests, completion dates for all requests and promises, and share anything that can change the advancement of the project.

8. Collaboration is key. As the project manager, it should be your rule to plan with the very people who will be the performers of the plan. Don’t wait until it is too late and the project is in trouble before you seek their help. Continue collaborating with these key players throughout the life of the project.

9. Listen actively and generously. For the most part, people are good and well-intended. Give people the benefit of the doubt, even when they may have cost valuable time and money. Take the time to listen to them, both clients and team members. Ask questions. Seek their opinions and ideas. Be generous with yourself, at the same time.

10. Expect the unexpected. Even a perfect plan cannot plan for every single thing. There are plenty of situations that simply cannot be anticipated and planned for. Be flexible and resilient, no matter what life may throw your way. Even in the harshest of setbacks, you and your team will learn something. When you do take a setback, and it will happen, review the previous nine rules for ideas on how to work your way out of it.

 

 

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